The 22 immutable laws of marketing: key takeaways and review of the book

The 22 immutable laws of marketing: key takeaways and review of the book

Think about how rules differ from laws. Rules are necessary to create a structure, and breaking them will not necessarily get you into trouble, but may help you develop and implement a great idea. But laws are not as flexible. It’s their observance that leads you to success, and Jack Trout and Al Ries emphasize this in their book “22 immutable laws of marketing. Violate them at your own risk!”

A review of the book 22 The Unbreakable Laws of Marketing. Violate them at your own risk!”

Advice at all times is usually the most valuable. Can Newton’s Law of Gravitation become obsolete? Hasn’t it proved its worth? At least we know exactly what happens when you step off a roof.

These are the kind of long-term patterns Jack Trout and Al Rice describe in their book “22 The Immutable Laws of Marketing. Violate them at your own risk!” Their work is considered one of the best books on marketing – primarily because of direct and clear recommendations. The authors have been able to untangle marketing laws and outline them in the form of 22 practical tips.

Writer and famous management guru Peter Drucker believes that compliance with marketing laws can bring significant benefits to the company. According to Forbes, Drucker’s particularly valuable observation is that the purpose of the business is to create clients, and this makes marketing an integral part of the life of the company. In this sense, marketing books (including those to which our reviews have been devoted) are truly invaluable to company executives.

The “22 Immutable Laws of Marketing” is considered one of the best books on marketing because of its practical focus. The book is quite short (143 pages in total), but contains very useful information that can really help a company succeed.

Key takeaways of “22 Immutable Laws of Marketing”

  1. Law of # 1. Being first is more important than being better/quality. It is much better to create your own category and be the 1st. No one will remember who went into space as the 2nd, although it was cooler. What can you be the first in?
  2. The law of categories. If you can’t be the 1st in the category, create your own, in which you will be the best. Everyone is interested in NEW, and only some are interested in the best. News generates huge traffic (new), while only a few people read longreads. Tim Ferris, for example, invented and obtained the category called “lifestile design”. The new category can be obtained by mixing two old ones. The category of “business model” has already been taken by Osterwalder.
  3. The law of the brain. It’s better to get to the human (client’s) brain first than to get to the market first. Marketing is a battle for minds and perception, not for the product. This law is the reinforcement of the 1st. America was discovered before Columbus, but Columbus was the first to enter the mass consciousness. When Groupon and Biglion appeared, the competition was at the level of “who will call first” to one or another service provider (restaurant, beauty salon) and who will be the first to meet him and talk about the new format. When the 2nd player entered the market, he was clearly losing, although he could be the 1st in the market.
  4. Law of perception. Marketing is a battle for perception, not for the product. Many people think that a good product will win in the end. But in fact, our perception is reality, and everything else, including the product and the reality itself, is nothing more than an illusion! To be and to appear is the same thing. Mercedes and BMV are not fighting for quality/style/design – but for what we think of their quality/style/design. This is the basis of information wars.
  5. The law of focus. You need to have your word in a man’s head. A simple word that you are associated with. There has to be one simple word aimed at the benefit of man. Mitsubishi, for example, inserts one word “reliability” in all advertising.
  6. The law of exclusivity. Two companies, can’t have one word in the human brain. The word “Fast Food” is taken over by McDonald’s and the other company can’t fit in. Just like with categories – you have to invent new words by mixing old ones or borrowing from other languages.
  7. Prisoner’s law. The strategy is based on the word you borrowed from the human brain. If it is “fast food”, then all competitive advantages are built around “fast food”, that is, around the speed of service. And Groupon’s original key was “group” – collective buying.
  8. The law of duality. In the long term, any market is a competition of 2 players: Coca-Cola and Pepsi, Reebok and Nike, etc. This is from our property – to have an alternative to everything.
  9. The law is from the opposite. If you mark the 2nd place, your strategy is determined by the 1st player. You do not have to kill the 1st place, you have to create an alternative. It’s a very correct position to “find your enemy”. Some people call themselves in the style of “iPhone Killer” – slightly wrong, it is better to position yourself as “iPhone’s main alternative” – 2 times cheaper and with a live battery.
  10. The law of division. Over time, any category begins to be divided into smaller ones. It needs to be monitored in time and take its place there as well. It’s just that computers are eventually divided into “personal” and “mainframe”. “Personal” to “laptops” and “workstations” and so on. People do not tolerate monopolies and lack of alternatives and create them themselves over time. And this is something that over time erodes any monopolies.
  11. The Law of Prospects. Alcohol is a depressant, but in the short term it is a stimulant that lifts the mood. It’s the same with marketing. The same way sales work – like alcohol, temporarily increasing revenues, but in the long run – killing the product. The classic conflict of short-term and long-term goals – decisions usually depend on the motivation of managers, and it is short-term (annual bonuses, etc.).
  12. The law of line continuation. An insurmountable desire to increase brand capacity in different directions. As a result – loss of focus and money. After 7UP have earned money, they moved on to 7UP diet. Same thing happened with IBM. The less, the better. You have to take a place and hold on to it. Many people’s mistake is to earn on something clear (focused) and then lose almost everything in an attempt to cover everything.
  13. The law of sacrifice. You have to give up something to get something. It’s a continuation of Law No. 12. We have to reduce the amount of products, not increase them. You need to target a specific character (Marlboro cowboy) then the market will be yours. McDonald’s and Apple have a very small range of products. If there are 2 sites and one sold “courses on sales, marketing and drawing,” and the other “only courses on drawing” – guess where they will buy the drawing?
  14. The Law of Attributes. For each attribute, there are other opposite and effective. Find a competitor and a conjurent word. The big one is small. Traditional education – long, expensive, in one place. Opposite – fast, useful, all over the world.
  15. The law of honesty. Honestly exaggerate your faults – and clients will turn them into dignity.
  16. The law of singularity (originality). In any situation – only one direction gives results. It’s something that, over time, slips through almost all companies. As the focus continues. It is better to be a good plumber than a “generalist”.
  17. The law of unpredictability. Until you write your competitors’ plans, you can’t guess the future. The main law is “no one knows anything.”
  18. The law of success. Success breeds self-confidence, self-confidence breeds failure. Made a cool project – made money – thought of himself as the smartest – began to act self-confident – failed, you learn lessons.
  19. The law of failure. The best way is to recognize failure in advance, jump out of the parachute in time and reduce your losses. Startupers have the illness of casino players – after losing, for example, $100k, you invest more and more, hoping to “get back” you drive yourself into debt. But it makes more sense to stop spending.
  20. The law of deceit. The situation is the opposite of what’s shown in the press. When the company’s doing well, it doesn’t need much publication. Which startups that raised the investment do we read particularly often in the press? Have they made an operational payback and will they ever come out?
  21. The law of growth. Successful programs are built on a steady trend, not a sharp growth. Many people make a mistake – as soon as the demand starts to grow, they satisfy it, and there is “overstocking” and people stop buying at all. This was the case with the Atari Games in the 80s. By the way, I once wrote a short history of video games at the Habra. The more successful ones, on the contrary, leave the demand “hungry” and create a deficit. A vivid example is the oil and diamond industry.
  22. The law of resources. Without adequate investment of time and money, nothing takes off. There are cases of bootstrapping (i.e. taking off with allegedly small resources) – but in any case it takes several years of hard work of the team. Investments in time are more important than investments in money.

 

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